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Marketplace

CBD-only store opens on DeKalb Avenue in Sycamore

CBD-only store opens on DeKalb Avenue in Sycamore

SYCAMORE – Chip Staebell wants the world to know that his store isn’t selling products for people to use to get high. It’s about pain relief, and it just opened Wednesday in Sycamore.

Staebell’s 1,500-square-foot shop, Your CBD Store, 1626 DeKalb Ave., sells products infused with cannabidiol oil, commonly known as CBD oil. Clients can come to him for a free consultation and samples, and buy CBD in a variety of forms, from the most popular oil and water-soluble products to pet-friendly, anti-anxiety products and even edible options such as sour gummy worms. Staebell said clients often use CBD products for pain relief, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, anxiety, post-traumatic stress and even seizure-related conditions.

“It’s for the customer that’s not after the high,” Staebell, 55, said Friday, sitting in his new storefront in Sycamore, which he said already has attracted a lot of customers.

“There’s a negative stigma out there,” Staebell said, referring to the CBD label, especially since the products are not yet regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. “The CBD does have some benefits that can relieve pain. It’s about education, and that’s why this store is so important, because people can come in and ask questions and we can be a resource to help them understand and not be intimidated by it.”

CBD is a byproduct of the flowers from a cannabis plant, the same type of plant that produces marijuana, but with a key difference. CBD comes from a type of cannabis plant called hemp, which produces less than 0.03%
Tetrahydrocannabinol, is the byproduct of the plant that creates a “high.” Marijuana plants also are a form of cannabis plant, but a strain with higher than 0.03% of THC.

Staebell’s shop is a franchise store affiliate of SunMed, a Tampa, Florida-based company quickly growing in the CBD retail industry. Illinois has
15 SunMed CBD stores already, Staebell said, that started up after the passage of the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.

SunMed’s hemp plants are organically grown in Colorado, Staebell said, then shipped to Florida for manufacturing and extraction. CBD is found in the flowers of hemp plants, and once extracted, the oil is sent to a lab for verification and testing.

A self-professed entrepreneur, Staebell lives in Sterling and also owns a few Anytime Fitness franchises in Rock Falls.

“I just kept seeing CBD-related news articles in publications,” he said. “I knew people that had success with it, so I did a lot of research and found this [franchise].”

Staebell said he uses CBD for elbow pain, especially since he’s an avid pickleball player.

“I’m very active, and I have joint pain in my elbows specifically,” he said. “I use the oil and the pain cream, and I experienced relief.”

The CBD products work in a number of ways, depending on how the customer chooses to ingest them. Staples such as the oil tinctures and water-soluble solutions can be bought for $40 for 1 ounce and typically last three to four weeks, Staebell said.

When taking a tincture, you place it under your tongue and it dissolves, and within 20 to 30 minutes, you begin to feel relief, Staebell said.

“It’s help without the high,” he said, referencing his store’s slogan. “There’s no psycho-affects at all. It’s mostly an older crowd that we attract.”

For first-time customers, Staebell recommends starting “low and slow,” and then upping dosage based on need or time, but each customer is different.

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