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Editorials

Thumbs-up, thumbs-down

Thumbs-up: To a new plan for repairing the environment around the DeKalb Park District’s Nature Trail. Since ComEd sent workers to clear-cut trees beneath power lines that parallel much of the trail, attempts to restore it to what it was have not made much headway. But a new plan for adding native plants and removing invasive and unwanted plant species in the area could set the 15.75-acre area on the path to long-term recovery. The Park District also now has an agreement that ComEd must give notice before it removes any plants in the area, something that wasn’t in place the last time. The new plants will have to be less than 10 feet tall, which means the environment will be different than it was – but it beats the alternative of having another clear-cut and community outrage.

Thumbs-up: To the DeKalb County Economic Development Corp. for 30 years of promoting business growth in DeKalb County. Together with major community stakeholders, the DCEDC continues to work to foster a business climate to help local businesses thrive and grow. Collaboration countywide helps promote the positives the county has to offer, such as the sizable talent pool from Northern Illinois University and Kishwaukee College and opportunities to attract more national and international companies to DeKalb County by connecting companies with the many valuable resources available. Here’s to another 30 years.

Thumbs-up: To a principal encouraging students to read by whatever means necessary. On Monday night, South Prairie Elementary School Principal Kreg Wesley slept in a tent in the school courtyard after students at the school met a goal of having read 7,000 books for the year. Wesley, who spent a windy night sleeping out, will have to dye his hair purple when the children reach 10,000 books, and then says he’ll shave it off when they reach 12,000. Anything educators can do to make students excited about reading is a good thing, and we hope for Wesley’s sake that after the students reach 10,000 books, they keep going to 12,000.

Thumbs-down: To a looming nuclear crisis. North Korea this week test-fired a gigantic nuclear missile, which it claims can be launched from a mobile erector-launcher vehicle. As North Korea continues to grow its nuclear and missile capabilities, the ways in which we console ourselves about the threat grow less reassuring. This week, an expert said that while Kim Jong Un’s latest ICBM would have a range of 8,100 miles, the nuclear payload North Korea would put on it would reduce its range so that it “barely reaches Seattle.” The nuclear threat to the U.S. and its allies around the world grows with each passing month, and the North Korean regime has proved it is willing to let its people starve to pursue nuclear ambitions. North Korea must be either defeated or accommodated. Nuclear war is not an option.

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