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Health

Too much noise: Bad for your ears and your heart

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But were you aware that it can also damage your heart?

Extensive research shows that those exposed to long-term loud noise, whether at work or at play,  appear to be more likely to develop heart disease, according to the Better Hearing Institute, which notes a connection between hearing loss and coronary heart disease.

The National Institutes of Health says 15 percent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high-frequency hearing loss related to noise exposure during occupational or leisure activities.

Those who work at jobs where they are constantly exposed to loud noise, or who engage in loud leisure activities, such as boating or music concerts, are at risk.

Researchers at Wichita State University analyzed more than eight decades worth of scientific research throughout the world confirming a direct link between the two. Another study showed that patients with low-frequency hearing loss should be regarded as at risk for cardiovascular events and should be referred for medical exam.

“The inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that it is possible that abnormalities in the cardiovascular system could be noted here earlier than in other less sensitive parts of the body,” according to David R. Friedland, MD, PhD, Professor and Vice-Chair of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, according to the Better Hearing Institute.

According to researchers at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health in Lexington  people with bilateral high-frequency hearing loss were approximately two times more likely to have coronary heart disease than people with normal high-frequency hearing. Those who were exposed to loud noise at work were four times more likely to have coronary heart disease.

Experts recommend using noise-cancelling headphones or earplugs when exposed to loud noise.

Hearing Help Express  |  1.800.496.3202  |  www.hhecenters.com  DeKalb Office: 1300 S 7th St, DeKalb, IL 60115 Huntley Office: 11800 Factory Shops Blvd, Ste 645 Huntely, IL 60142

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