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Early photography the topic of lunch lecture

Published: Monday, April 28, 2014 11:32 a.m. CDT
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Larry Gregory, associate professor emeritus, Northern Illinois University School of Art, will explore the early development of photography and the evolution of the pioneering photographic techniques at the Sycamore History Museum's Brown Bag lunch at noon Thursday.

Why do your oldest family photographs look the way they do?

On Thursday, during the Sycamore History Museum’s Brown Bag lunch, visitors can learn about early photography. The event features Larry Gregory, associate professor emeritus, Northern Illinois University School of Art, will explore the early development of photography and the evolution of the pioneering photographic techniques, as well as touch on the use of materials and the refinement of these processes. 

In its infancy, photography was labor intensive and time consuming. Yet the public expressed eagerness for pictures that could reveal information and feeling similar to that found in paintings and other established and emerging forms of art. Gregory will discuss what expectations for the medium were being held by artists and consumers and potential problems that needed to be solved. 

The program, complementing the exhibit, “General Dutton’s America,” will be held at noon Thursday at the Sycamore History Museum, 1730 N. Main St.

The talk is free and open to the public. Donations are welcome. For more information, visit www.sycamorehistory.org or call 815-895-5762.

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