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Solemn tributes mark Boston Marathon bombing

Published: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 10:12 p.m. CDT • Updated: Tuesday, April 15, 2014 10:29 p.m. CDT
Caption
(Steven Senne)
Olivia Savarino, center, hugs Christelle Pierre-Louis, left, as Callie Benjamin, right, looks on near the finish line of the Boston Marathon during ceremonies on Boylston Street, Tuesday in Boston. Savarino and Benjamin were working at the Forum restaurant when a bomb went off in front of the building on April 15, 2013. (AP Photo)

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died following a shootout with police days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is awaiting a trial in which he faces a possible death sentence. Prosecutors say the brothers also killed MIT police Officer Sean Collier days after the bombings in an attempt to steal his gun.

Prosecutors have said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev left a hand-scrawled confession condemning U.S. actions in Muslim countries on the inside wall of a boat in which he was found hiding following the police shootout.

At the tribute, several survivors of the bombing alluded to their injuries but focused on the strength they’ve drawn from fellow survivors, first responders, doctors, nurses and strangers who have offered them support.

“We should never have met this way, but we are so grateful for each other,” said Patrick Downes, a newlywed who was injured along with his wife. Each lost a left leg below the knee in the bombings.

Downes described Boston Strong, the slogan coined after the attack, as a movement that symbolizes the city’s determination to recover. He called the people who died “our guardian angels.”

“We will carry them in our hearts,” he said.

Downes said the city on April 21 will “show the world what Boston represents.” He added, “For our guardian angels, let them hear us roar.”

Adrianne Haslet-Davis, a ballroom dancer who lost her left leg below the knee and has recently returned to performing on a prosthetic leg, said she’s learned over the last year that no milestone is too small to celebrate, including walking into a non-handicapped bathroom stall for the first time and “doing a happy dance.”

Gov. Deval Patrick spoke of how the attack has drawn people closer.

“There are no strangers here,” he repeated throughout his speech.

Carlos Arredondo, the cowboy hat-wearing spectator who was hailed as a hero for helping the wounded after the bombings, said he went to the tribute ceremony to support survivors and their families.

“You can see how the whole community gathered together to support them and remember,” Arredondo said.

After the tributes, many of those in attendance walked in the rain to the finish line for a moment of silence that coincided with the time when the bombs went off. Bells rang, and a flag was raised by transit agency police Officer Richard Donohue, who was badly injured during a shootout with the bombing suspects.

Aleksander Jonca wore a blue windbreaker from last year’s race, which he was unable to finish because of the bombings. He’s running again this year, with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

“All of us have a different path to heal, and I think today is a good way to do that together and honor the survivors,” Jonca said.

Earlier in the day, a wreath-laying ceremony drew the families of the three people killed – Martin Richard, Krystle Campbell and Lu Lingzi — and Collier’s relatives.

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