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Crime & Courts

Bond restrictions tightened for Maple Park man

SYCAMORE – A motion to revoke electronic home monitoring of a Maple Park man was denied Tuesday, but the judge did place additional restrictions on his movements.

Prosecutors had moved to revoke the electronic home monitoring of Jay Trout, 43, of the 300 block of West Elian Court, who was convicted in September of aggravated battery of a child in his care. He is scheduled to be sentenced Oct. 24.

In their request, prosecutors said Trout had violated his bond by taking a weekend trip to a lake in Wisconsin from Oct. 4 to 6. Trout’s attorney, Dale Clark, argued that the court order establishing electronic home monitoring allowed Trout to leave the state for work.

John Pierotti, an acquaintance of Trout, testified Trout had visited his property in Wisconsin to survey it and offer a bid on installing geothermal wells on the property. Trout then spent a day helping Pierotti winterize his lake cabin and boat, labor for which Pierotti said he paid him.

DeKalb County Sheriff’s deputies who oversee the electronic home monitoring program said Trout mentioned that he planned to go to Wisconsin for the weekend, but did not provide required information such as when he was leaving and returning, where he would be staying and what he would be doing there.

DeKalb County Presiding Judge Robbin Stuckert ruled that Trout could remain on electronic home monitoring, but tightened the restrictions on him to prevent him from leaving the state for any reason.

She said the details of the Wisconsin trip sounded more like recreation than a legitimate work trip, and warned Trout that any future violations would land him back in jail.

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