Illinois enacts nation's final concealed-gun law

Published: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 12:15 p.m.CDT • Updated: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 2:19 p.m.CDT
Caption
(Scott Eisen)
FILE - In this July 2, 2013 file photo, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn speaks during a news conference in Chicago after he used his amendatory veto power to tweak the concealed carry legislation sent to him after months of debate and negotiation over the measure. Quinn predicted a "showdown" in Springfield over his proposed changes to the legislation, but there was little indication from lawmakers and legislative leaders a day ahead of a Tuesday, July 9 vote that they'd do much more than reject his demands. (AP Photo/Scott Eisen, File)
Caption
(Seth Perlman)
FILE - In this May 24, 2013 file photo, Illinois Rep. Brandon Phelps, D-Harrisburg, argues concealed carry gun legislation at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. Gov. Pat Quinn predicted a "showdown" in Springfield over his proposed changes to a concealed carry bill, but there was little indication from lawmakers and legislative leaders a day ahead of a Tuesday, July 9, 2013, vote that they'd do much more than reject his demands. Phelps, the sponsor of the bill, said Quinn's late changes put Illinois at risk of "going off the cliff" and not meeting the July 9 deadline. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

SPRINGFIELD – Illinois has become the final state in the nation to allow the public possession of concealed guns, just ahead of a federal appeals court's deadline.

The state Senate voted 41-17 Tuesday to override Gov. Pat Quinn's veto of the concealed carry legislation lawmakers sent him. The House took the same action earlier in the day.

The Chicago Democrat's amendatory veto suggested changes to the delicately negotiated initiative — changes that anti-violence activists embraced.

Quinn wanted guns banned from any establishment that serves alcohol and wanted to limit gun-toting citizens to one firearm at a time.

Senate President John Cullerton says Quinn's recommendations might be addressed in later legislation.

The Illinois State Police must be ready to accept applications in six months. Officials expect 300,000 to apply in the first year.

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