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Putin: Snowden must stop leaking secrets to stay

Published: Monday, July 1, 2013 10:37 a.m. CDT • Updated: Monday, July 1, 2013 10:38 a.m. CDT
Caption
(Yuri Kadobnov)
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano during their meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. A Kremlin press service official said, "During the meeting, it is planned to discuss matters concerning the development of Russia-IAEA interaction in the field of uses of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, as well as some aspects of international cooperation in the field of nuclead non-proliferation." (AP Photo/Yuiri Kadobnov, Pool)

MOSCOW – Russia's President Vladimir Putin says that National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden will have to stop leaking U.S. secrets if he wants to get asylum in Russia, something he says Snowden doesn't want to do.

Putin, speaking at a news conference Monday, insisted that Snowden isn't a Russian agent and that Russian security agencies haven't contacted him.

He says that Snowden considers himself a rights activist, a "new dissident" and compared him to Nobel Peace Prize winner Andrei Sakharov.

Snowden has been caught in legal limbo in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport where he arrived from Hong Kong. The U.S. has annulled his passport.

Putin wouldn't say if any of the leaders of gas exporting nations attending a summit in Moscow could offer Snowden shelter.

Europe's outage was triggered by a Sunday report by German news weekly Der Spiegel that the U.S. National Security Agency bugged diplomats from friendly nations — such as the EU offices in Washington, New York and Brussels. The report was partly based on an ongoing series of revelations of U.S. eavesdropping leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

In a sign of the distrust the report had sowed, the German government launched a review of its secure government communications network and the EU's executive, the European Commission, ordered "a comprehensive ad hoc security sweep."

"Eavesdropping on friends is unacceptable," German government spokesman Steffen Seibert told reporters in Berlin. "We're not in the Cold War anymore."

Germany has been among the European countries most anxious to reach a trade deal with the U.S., and it will likely try to strike a careful balance in its criticism of Washington.

It is the second time, however, the free-trade talks have hung in the balance because of French concerns. Two weeks ago, as the EU was deciding on its mandate for the talks, France led an all-out campaign to keep cultural industries off the table that almost scuttled the negotiations.

The European Commission also demanded an explanation. Their foreign affairs chief spoke to Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday about the reports at a security conference in Southeast Asia.

"I will say that every country in the world that is engaged in international affairs with national security undertakes lots of activities to protect its national security and all kinds of information contributes to that," Kerry said on the sidelines in Brunei, adding that he had been busy with meetings about the Mideast peace process and wasn't familiar with the specifics of the most recent claims.

"And all I know is that that is not unusual for lots of nations. But beyond that, I'm not going to comment any further until I have all the facts and find out precisely what the situation is," he said.

It's unclear how widespread similar practices actually are. But some in Europe have raised concerns that U.S. efforts include economic espionage. When asked whether Germany spies on its allies, Seibert responded: "It's not the policy of the German government to eavesdrop on friendly states in their embassies. That should be obvious."

Italy also stepped up its criticism of the surveillance on Monday, with Foreign Minister Emma Bonino saying Italy had asked the Americans for the "necessary clarifications for this very thorny issue." In a statement, Bonino said the Americans had promised to provide clarification to both the EU and individual member states.

Italy has largely downplayed earlier reports of Snowden's revelations, even that the U.S. had spied on G-20 members, in part because Italians are so used to being listened in on by their own government. Italy is the most wiretapped Western democracy, with transcripts of telephone intercepts of politicians and criminals routinely splashed on front pages.

Despite the rhetoric, the threat to the trade negotiations is likely to be minimal. For one, technical negotiations often proceed at a level largely detached from political considerations and so far, there have been no EU plans to let the first round of the trans-Atlantic free trade talks from fall victim to discord over the snooping scandal. Such talks traditionally need to develop a momentum of their own and would suffer huge delays if they were held up each time there was political strike between the parties.

The U.S. government is organizing the first round from July 8-12 in Washington.

France is far less eager for a deal than Germany, and Hollande could face pressure from parties on the left that he often needs to pass legislation. The country's ecology party — which has two ministers in government — said Snowden should be given political asylum in France. France's far left party, Leftist Front, also called for asylum. Snowden has been in a no man's land at Moscow's airport for days.

According to the Der Spiegel report on Sunday, the NSA planted bugs in the EU's diplomatic offices in Washington and infiltrated the building's computer network. Similar measures were taken at the EU's mission to the United Nations in New York, the magazine said.

It also reported that the NSA used secure facilities at NATO headquarters in Brussels to dial into telephone maintenance systems that would have allowed it to intercept senior officials' calls and Internet traffic at a key EU office nearby.

The Spiegel report cited classified U.S. documents taken by Snowden that the magazine said it had partly seen. It did not publish the alleged NSA documents it cited nor say how it obtained access to them.

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