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Features

Final preparations being made for ‘Annie’

“Annie,” a uniquely American story about survival, pluck, second chances, generosity and triumph, opens at the historic Sandwich Opera House next week. This Broadway sensation, ripped from the pages of a comic strip, won three Tony Awards: Best Musical, Best Original Score and Best Book. 

“Annie” is a spunky orphan with infectious, unbeatable optimism and moxie. She’s determined to find her parents, who abandoned her years ago on the doorstep of a New York City orphanage run by the cruel and bitter Miss Hannigan. She does escape, but is caught and returned, only to be selected as the needy child who’d stay at billionaire Daddy Warbucks’ mansion during the holidays. Shenanigans ensue, relationships grow, and even President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Secret Service join the fray. 

“Annie” will be performed for a limited five-performance engagement on the Opera House stage March 21 to 24. Thursday, Friday and Saturday performances begin at 7 p.m., with a Saturday and Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. The theater, a known landmark in DeKalb County, is located at 140 E. Railroad St. in Sandwich. 

Tickets cost $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Tickets can be purchased online at www.wewantpr.com or by calling 888-395-0797. 

“Annie” is based on the Tribune Media Service Comic Strip, “Little Orphan Annie,” with book by Thomas Meehan, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Martin Charnin. 

“This show takes place in an era that many of our grandparents lived through as children,” Kris Pagoria, director of the production, said in a news release. “And the stark contrast between the classes still makes the Depression era one of America’s most intriguing historical periods.”

“Our cast has been working extremely hard,” he said. “You won’t be disappointed.”

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