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Local

Community gathers to remember Toni Keller


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DeKALB – About a thousand people raised lit candles in the air as one of Antinette "Toni" Keller's favorite songs "Here Comes the Sun" by the Beatles played Tuesday night in Ellington Ballroom.

Friends and family as a "ray of sunshine," an artist, a friend and someone who always had a smile on her face. About a dozen of Keller's friends brought sunflowers to the gathering in honor of Keller.

Those who filed into the ballroom on NIU's campus were given beaded key chains with red, black and white beads; black and red ribbons and a candle to light in Keller's memory.

Yellow flowers were placed on tables that were arranged on each side of the ballroom. Some people wore yellow scarves, clothing or flowers in their hair.

Some students, like sophomore Danielle Goodin, thought the blistery, stormy weather was almost ironic in light of news about Keller's case.

"It seems like it could never happen here," she said.

Junior Melanie Inglis described people on campus as "shocked, distressed and mad."

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